Calcium Propionate Function In Bread

Calcium Propionate: An Experment To Show Function In Bread

Calcium Propionate Function In Bread

Observation on the Effect of Calcium Propionate on Bread Mildew

Pastry food mildew is a common situation in the pastry production and processing and retail industries, especially in the rainy season. It not only causes significant economic losses, but also affects consumer safety, and even food poisoning. In order to explore the anti-mildew measures of pastries and improve the sanitary quality of the pastries, we conducted an observation experiment on the anti-mould effect of calcium propionate on bread, to find the calcium propionate function in bread.

Calcium Propionate Function In Bread
Calcium Propionate Function In Bread

Calcium propionate has a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of molds and yeasts. Many tests have shown that it is almost non-toxic to the human body. Therefore, since 1940, foreign countries have been added to food as an anti-mold agent under the initiative of many researchers. , European and American countries have successively approved the use, Japan has allowed bread and Western cakes as additives since July 1963, but the allowable amount of use in different countries is different. Japanese regulations must not exceed 0.1%, and the United States limits it to 0.125-10. %, and the FAO/WHO maximum allowable amount can be 0.314%. In 1984, China, approved by the National Bureau of Standards, listed calcium propionate as a food additive.

Calcium Propionate Function In Bread Examin Process:

1 Materials and methods

1.1 Calcium propionate: edible grade provided by A.M FOOD Chemical Plant, white powder.

1.2 Egg bread: provided by a food factory in this city, each weighing 80 grams, with wrapping paper outside.

1.3 According to the normal production process of bread, add calcium propionate in an amount of 0.1% to the fermented dough, mix it thoroughly, and then perform shaping, baking, cooling, and packaging. Thirty samples were aseptically sampled as the experimental group, while 30 samples without calcium propionate were used as the control group.

1.4 Put 30 samples of each of the experimental group and the control group in the food cabinet, and sample and inspect them on the first, fourth, seventh, and tenth days, and record the temperature and relative humidity every day.

1.5 Inspection items and methods: the total number of molds (pieces/g); the yeast count (pieces/g) shall be sampled or gram aseptically, and placed in an eggplant bottle filled with lond sterilized distilled water preheated at about 50°C. Fully shake it into a 1:10 dilution, pipette 1ml of this solution into a 9ml sterile distilled water test tube, mix to make a 1:10 dilution, then pipette this solution 1 to 9 and place it in a sterile distilled water test tube, and mix it evenly. 1:10) diluent, in the preparation of 1:10, 1:1 instrument. At the same time of the two diluents, pipette 1ml of the diluent into a sterilized petri dish with the pipette that draws the dilution. Make two petri dishes for each dilution, and wait until it is cooled to about 45°C Tiger Red Chloramphenicol Medium (RB C) Pour into a petri dish to make it evenly mixed. After solidification, place it flat in a 25℃-28℃ incubator, and observe the results on the 4th to 5th days. Both molds and yeasts take the average of two dilutions to report

2 Results and analysis

2.1 In this experiment, 30 samples of the experimental group and the control group were stored in a food cabinet at 23°C-28°C and a relative humidity of 89%-94%. The natural mold growth was observed for 10 consecutive days. The results showed that the control group samples Mold began to grow after 4 days, and the samples of the experimental group began to grow mold on 7-9 days, which was 3 to 5 days later than the control group. For this reason, from the sensory point of view, adding 0.1% calcium propionate to the bread can be delayed. The moldy time of bread extends the shelf life of bread.

2.2 The total number of molds is shown in Table 1. It can be seen that calcium propionate has an inhibitory effect on the growth of mold in bread, and the inhibitory effect is obvious within 1 week after production. With the extension of time, the inhibitory effect decreases after 1 week.

Table 1 Number of samples in group Calcium propionate antibacterial effect on mold in bread (total number of molds: pcs/g)

 

 

Samples

Range

XBS

T

P

Day 1

Test Part

30

0-500

196.67135.36

2.88

<0.01

Compare Part

30

0-2300

416.67389.09

Day 4

Test Part

30

0-1000

280179.63

2.72

<0.01

Compare Part

30

100-2.8×10000

3283.335934.48

Day 7

Test Part

30

100-1600

520305.94

5.37

<0.01

Compare Part

30

900-6.7 x10000

1903.3319450.30

Day l0

Test Part

30

0-9.0x 10000

4426.6716126.77

1.95

0.05

Compare Part

30

4000-1.0x x100000000

6652066.67+-18390019.42

2.3 The yeast count is detailed in Table 2. From the test results, calcium propionate has a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of yeast. The yeast in the bag has no obvious inhibitory effect in the first few days, but after 4 days,

Table 2 Calcium propionate’s antibacterial and antibacterial effect on bread (yeast count: pcs/g) detection range

 

Samples

Range

XBS

T

P

Day 1

Test Part

30

0-600

103.33113.97

1.35

0.05

Compare 

30

0-1700

183.34297.86

Day 4

Test Part

30

0-200

56.6755.88

2.91

<0.01

Compare 

30

0-24000

3577.376505.56

Day 7

Test Part

30

0-1500

126.67279.21

4.34

<0.01

Compare 

30

200-140000

3028037430.41

Day l0

Test Part

30

0-2000

106.70380.28

3.19

<0.01

Compare 

30

0-210000

27833.33+-46851.60

3 summary

3.1 This experiment explored the anti-mold effect of calcium propionate on bread, and found that adding 0.1% calcium propionate to bread can delay bread mold for 3 to 5 days.

3.2 The inhibitory effect of calcium propionate on the mold in bread was most obvious within 1 week, and the effect decreased after 1 week.

3.3 The inhibitory effect of calcium propionate on the yeast in bread is more significant after 4 days.